FAQ

Frequently asked
Questions

You list different types of blades such as rip and crosscut. Can’t I just use a universal blade?

Each blade tooth has a specific geometry which relates to the angle at which the blade will come into contact with the material you are cutting. Both crosscut and rip saw are specifically describing the way in which you will be cutting your wood. Crosscut is designed to cut perpendicular to the grain, this means unlike a rip saw it will have to be cutting the wood which will mean a change in geometry as to how the sawblade contacts the wood as well as it’s frequency of contact.

A rip saw as it’s name would suggest allows for longer strides allowing the wood to work with the sawblade to tear with the grain. 

I can get a blade, the same blade but much cheaper from another company. Is there any difference in the blades or are yours just expensive?

Our blades are made using the highest standards. The raw materials used are the highest quality materials used in the circular saw blade industry. The steel used in the saw bodies conform to the highest German standards for circular saw steel.

Our blades only use the highest quality of tungsten carbide sourced from Europe using specific grades for different applications. Once again all of our carbide tips conform and surpass international standards.

If you look at the photo to the right you can clearly see the difference in tip size on the two blades (our Tru-Cut range to the left). This equates to life of the blade in terms of the number of times that the blade’s tips can be sharpened. This however requires the saw body to be made from the correct material to retain the tension and ensure that your saw lasts for the entire lifetime of the tools.   

When should my saw blade be sharpened?

Dependent on the function of your sawblade and frequency of its use so too will sharpening process be needed. The range of frequency can vary from 50 – 250 cuts.

Can I sharpen my own saw blades?

Sawblades have different pitch angles and bevel directions, for you to do the blade true justice to work best for you we do not advise this.

Consider a recondition on your blade which we will not only sharpen your blade but re-align it too.

Can my saw blade be sharpened?


A sawblade may be a plate saw which yes dependent on body condition of sawblade it may be sharpened.

Some sawblades are tungsten Carbide Tipped which dependent on body condition, and size of carbide tip left on sawblade will be factors assessing if blade should be sharpened again or not. 

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Do you repair saw blades?

Yes, we have a strong team and years of knowledge backed up by advanced processes and machinery to assess and repair most sawblades.

What are the different grades of tungsten carbide used and why?

Tungsten carbide is available in numerous grades. The grades all differ in both chemical and physical properties. Some common grades used for circular saw blades can be found in

Can I use the same blade for different materials?

Blades are made specifically in their geometry to best meet the function prescribed. As much as it is not advised for continual use on the wrong material a quick cut here or there would be dependent on the material you choose to cut.If you would need a blade to cut varying materials let’s see which blade would make the best compromises to the assorted materials.
You list different types of blades such as rip and crosscut. Can’t I just use a universal blade?

Each blade tooth has a specific geometry which relates to the angle at which the blade will come into contact with the material you are cutting. Both crosscut and rip saw are specifically describing the way in which you will be cutting your wood. Crosscut is designed to cut perpendicular to the grain, this means unlike a rip saw it will have to be cutting the wood which will mean a change in geometry as to how the sawblade contacts the wood as well as it’s frequency of contact.

A rip saw as it’s name would suggest allows for longer strides allowing the wood to work with the sawblade to tear with the grain.



Are non-ferrous blade always a negative hook angle?

Non-ferrous blades refer to the cutting of metal and dependent on the type of machine you are using the hook can vary between -10 and +10 dependent on the application. Negative will always work but positive cuts more freely. However please be aware that in some machines if you are climb cutting positive hook will pull into the blade and be dangerous. We are always in hand to advice where possible.

Are non-ferrous blade always a negative hook angle?

Non-ferrous blades refer to the cutting of metal and dependent on the type of machine you are using the hook can vary between -10 and +10 dependent on the application. Negative will always work but positive cuts more freely. However please be aware that in some machines if you are climb cutting positive hook will pull into the blade and be dangerous. We are always in hand to advice where possible.

You list different types of blades such as rip and crosscut. Can’t I just use a universal blade?

Each blade tooth has a specific geometry which relates to the angle at which the blade will come into contact with the material you are cutting. Both crosscut and rip saw are specifically describing the way in which you will be cutting your wood. Crosscut is designed to cut perpendicular to the grain, this means unlike a rip saw it will have to be cutting the wood which will mean a change in geometry as to how the sawblade contacts the wood as well as it’s frequency of contact.

A rip saw as it’s name would suggest allows for longer strides allowing the wood to work with the sawblade to tear with the grain. 

Check out our extra info page for diagrams of the different blade geometry 

FYi